IEC Electronics Lab Receives ISO/IEC 17025 Accreditation Renewal


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IEC Electronics Corp.'s Analysis and Testing Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico has once again received an ISO/IEC 17025:2005 accreditation from the ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB). The scope of the accreditation includes several SAE AS6171 test methods for suspect/counterfeit, electrical, electronic and electromechanical (EEE) parts. IEC is the first and only electronic manufacturing services (EMS) provider with an on-site testing laboratory to receive this prestigious accreditation with the addition of SAE AS6171 test methods.

The ISO/IEC 17025:2005 accreditation is the internationally accepted specification of general requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. The SAE AS6171 test methods were developed specifically for laboratories for the detection and avoidance of suspect/counterfeit parts. Currently, SAE AS6171 is the only standard that provides uniform requirements, practices, and test methods making it more stringent than other counterfeit avoidance protocols.

"IEC's Analysis and Testing Lab provides a valuable advantage for us in the marketplace. We are continuously implementing new technology and testing methods to ensure we have best-in-class capabilities. This ISO 17025 accreditation combined with SAE AS6171 test methods for suspect counterfeit parts illustrates our expertise and commitment to our customers requiring component risk mitigation," commented Jeffrey T. Schlarbaum, president and CEO of IEC Electronics. "The ability of IEC's Analysis and Testing Laboratory to help detect suspect or counterfeit electronics plays an integral role in minimizing supply chain risk for the life-saving and mission critical products we support, and is a competitive differentiator for our company. It's particularly gratifying to be the first and only electronic manufacturing services provider to achieve this enhanced accreditation."

ANAB recognizes the importance of defining suspect/counterfeit test methods within the ISO/IEC 17025 scope to further enhance this robust accreditation. Roger Muse, an ANAB Vice President, stated, "We applaud the first-mover approach that the team from IEC Electronics has taken. By incorporating several of the SAE AS6171 test methods into their ISO/IEC 17025 scope of accreditation, they have set the necessary triggers to inspire more laboratories to demonstrate competence through third party conformity assessment."

IEC Electronics was pivotal in the support of the SAE G-19 committee, which was established to create a process for detection, prevention, and counteraction of suspect/counterfeit parts to be adopted by the Department of Defense; and the release of SAE AS6171 test methods. These standards are suitable for use in aeronautic, space, defense, civil, and commercial electronic equipment applications for risk mitigation of suspect/counterfeit electronic components.

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