Boeing's Latest 737-9 ecoDemonstrator Testing Crane A&Es New Long-range Sensing


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Crane Aerospace & Electronics, a segment of Crane Co., has been selected to feature its new Long-Range Wireless Tire Pressure Sensors on Boeing’s 2021 737-9 ecoDemonstrator program.

Crane A&E’s Long-Range Tire Pressure Sensors are installed on two of the aircraft’s four main landing gear wheels and represent an innovative evolvement of Crane A&E’s wireless sensing technology. Crane A&E’s new sensors communicate with a maintenance tablet with a Crane A&E-developed application that allows maintenance personnel to easily access and analyze tire pressure data. The system enhances tire-related safety, reduces maintenance and operating cost, maximizes tire life and permits predictive maintenance.

“For years, we have had the honor of supplying industry-leading wireless tire pressure sensing to our global customer base,” said Hilary King, Crane A&E VP & GM, Sensing & Power Systems. “Our new Long-Range Wireless Tire Pressure Sensors are the latest in our ongoing commitment to provide leading edge sensing solutions to improve aviation operations for our commercial and military customers. We are pleased to demonstrate our new technology on Boeing’s prestigious ecoDemonstrator.”

Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator program accelerates innovation by taking promising technologies out of the lab and testing them in the air to solve real-world challenges for airlines, passengers and the environment. Eight airplanes have served as flying test beds for the program since it began in 2012.

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